Friday, October 05, 2007

Random Post #xxx

The blog's been sleeping for a few days because I havent, but here's some random images I found under "blogged" though they never were. I guess at the time I thought I didnt need them, they were not good enough, not interesting, and now that I've nothing to blog (etc etc)

I think this was an ad for something, somewhere
cute building in Tokyo, somewhere close to boring Ginza
a plan of the Paolo Soleri Acrosanti complex, I might have even blogged this before
a nightclub sign from Cherry Grove in Fire Island. If you've read classic gay fiction like Andrew Hollerans' "Dancer from the Dance", then you've probably read about the Ice Palace
mirror building with eco-wig

2 comments:

reinito a.k.a brayan said...

huh? classic gay fiction?

:)

Andreas Angelidakis said...

yes the classics: Dancer from the Dance. by Andrew Holleran; Plume, New York, 1978. (ISBN 0-452-26129-5)

Andrew Holleran, a Harvard graduate, was a member of the Violet Quill, an organization dedicated to the creation of a new "Gay Literature" for the post-Stonewall period. This book has been extremely influential, and its sequels include #2 Nights in Aruba, and #3 The Beauty of Men. In this book, Anthony Malone leaves his promising law career to spend ten years looking for true love in the lonely, superficial, nihilistic, and hedonistic world of the Manhattan and Fire Island party circuit in the 1970's. Aiding him on his quest, and to some extent exploiting him, is Andrew Sutherland, the archetypical urban, cynical, witty, older Gay man. Aside from being a reflection on some problems within the Gay community, it also well documents its era.

City of Night. by John Rechy; Grove Press, New York, 1988. (ISBN 0-8021-3083-6)

This novel, which was first published in 1963, documents the narrator's journey to self awareness during his exodus through the Gay underworld of Pre-Stonewall America. After he is discharged from the army, he wanders through New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, and New Orleans. Many historic cruising locations are described. He encounters many characters whose behaviors and traits will seem all too familiar even today. While the drag queens aspired to femininity, the leather men and male hustlers assumed a contrived, hyper-masculine facade. Many feigned indifference to conceal their vulnerability and loneliness. They placed a premium on youth, and its loss was mourned. Some used hedonism or denial to escape their feelings of self-loathing and guilt. Some relationships were based upon both parties attempting to exploit each other. Photographs were treasured after the lover was lost.

etc etc